Major General Bill Moore speaks about Developing Ground Manoeuvre Requirements For The British Army at International Armoured Vehicles February 2011.

As the UK MoD’s lead for developing requirements for all ground manoeuvre Major General Moore, will discuss what the future holds for mounted capabilities in the British Army. With the full results of the SDSR now becoming apparent and digested by community at large, he’ll look to what the future holds for military vehicles, what new systems the Army will require, what upgrades to existing systems will be necessary and how this fits within the overall context of developing the land forces. As we begin to look towards a post-Afghanistan army, this session will be a very timely opportunity to examine how we get best value for future investment and ensure that the systems we acquire will deliver the greatest tactical advantage.

In 1996 and following a raft of Regimental appointments, predominantly in the UK’s Airborne Brigade, Major General Bill Moore took command of 7th Parachute Regiment Royal Horse Artillery in Aldershot In 1998 he was selected for promotion and was posted as Colonel Force Development in the Directorate General of Doctrine and Development.  His job was to conduct the long term planning for the Army – to work out the Capabilities required in 10-20(+) year’s time and then produce a plan for achieving them.  In this vein he worked closely with the US Army.  He attended the Higher Command and Staff Course in 2000.

In 2001 he was posted as the operational commander for the Sierra Leone Armed Forces during their fight with the rebels – the Revolutionary United Front, for which he was awarded the Queen’s Commendation for Valuable Service.  In December 2001 he took command of 19th Mechanized Brigade.  Having exercised the Brigade in Canada in 2002, he commanded the Joint Task Force in Sierra Leone during OP KEELING – successfully deterring threats to UK’s interests there.  From June to November in 2003 he commanded the Brigade in South East Iraq, for which he was awarded The Cross of Merit from the Czech Republic and was made a Commander of the British Empire.  His previous operational experience includes Northern Ireland, the retaking of the Falkland Islands and service with the United Nations.

In January 2004 he became the Director of Equipment Capability (Ground Manoeuvre) in the Ministry of Defence.  His responsibilities included the requirement and funding for most of the equipment found in an Army Brigade, Royal Marine Commando or RAF Force Protection Wing.  His main focus was, however, on Urgent Operational Requirements, getting new equipment into service for both Iraq and Afghanistan, having responsibility for over 135 programmes at his time of departure in May 2007.  On promotion he became the Director General Logistics, Support and Equipment in Land Forces in charge of Army logistics, communication, and Capability Integration.  He was also responsible for the operating costs of the Army’s in-service equipment. 

In January 2009 he was posted to 1st US Corps based in Fort Lewis as the Deputy Commanding General for Iraqi Security Forces in preparation for the Corps’ tour of Iraq.  He deployed to Iraq in March 2009 taking responsibility for coherence between Iraqi and US operations Iraq-wide.  He was also responsible for Arab/Kurd issues.  The US awarded him the Legion of Merit for his achievements.  He returned in late Jul 09 when the UK mission was brought to an abrupt end.  He was then seconded to PricewaterhouseCoopers and Thales before assuming the appointments of Director Battlespace Manoeuvre and Master General of the Ordnance in the MOD in February 2010.  As part of the SDSR, he led the study into the Royal Navy.

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